Sneakers Hanging on a Wire

I always thought that shoes are hanging on the wires were a cool fad until I learned something different.

In many communities, one can see a pair of shoes swinging on power lines. This practice is called shoe tossing, and it is often spotted in urban areas or college neighborhoods throughout the world. There is no universal meaning for shoes hanging on power lines, but one is able to interpret the message depending on the location of the shoes. Some youth perform shoe tossing simply because they have witnessed others do it. For others, it is a symbol of a prime drug-dealing location, gang representation or death.
When shoes are hanging from telephone wires in an intersection, it is sometimes a sign that gang members are claiming the premises for themselves. It is also a symbol used to indicate hot spots for addicts to purchase the drugs they are looking for. The sudden death of a popular youth in the community often causes friends or family members to perform shoe tossing in a loved one’s honor.

So I’m not sure what that means for when I saw the sneakers swinging on the wires at Mabel Davis District Park. I am hoping its not about drugs. There is a skate park, a playground and the swimming pool.

img_2828

Advertisements

About christy

I'm a freelance photographer. I love creating visual eye candy, be it my digital artwork or photography. More often than not, it turns out to be a combination of both. Whatever catches my eye, I shoot, specializing in landscapes, sports and portraits." Hailed from the Texas-born Baton Rouge, Louisiana residence, my photography was always my hobby, off and on, when time permitted. I had itched for a big change. I bought my first DSLR camera, I found myself falling back into photography again, and I've decided to pursue it full-time. I am specializing in landscapes however my interests are in the horizon into family portraits, senior portraits, sports, events and whatever catches my eye, I shoot.
This entry was posted in All About Austin Snapshots, Austin, Texas City Parks and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s